The Blessing of Curiosity

When I was in Nepal, some friends came to visit and we decided to take an airplane flight around Mt. Everest. I wasn’t much of a hiker then, so even trekking to Base Camp didn’t hold much of an appeal. But I knew I wanted to see the highest peak in the world.

IMG_1243The flight was incredible. We were in a tiny plane and my friend, who once held the title of Navigator of Air Force One turned a blind eye to all of the FAA code violations. But, when we saw Everest through the windows, it was breathtaking.

I’ve always been someone who’s held a healthy reverence for Nature. I’ll be the first to turn around if a thunderstorm threatens us above tree line; I prefer to hike with buddies; I’ve never set out to push the limits or conquer a mountain or a trail. I feel like the vast majority of the time man goes up against nature, nature will win.

When Frank and I were talking about “walking humbly with God,” he said hiking immediately came to mine. The vast magnificence of nature keeps him humble. (Though, I challenge you to have a discussion about life with Frank that doesn’t somehow circle back to hiking and/or nature…)

There is something humbling about nature and all that we don’t know. When I’m on a trail or in the Grand Tetons, I’m in awe of how huge our world is. And then I read about new discoveries, deep in the ocean and am reminded even more so that we don’t know a whole lot about this earth. If I’m really ready to be awed, I’ll start to think about the scope of our small planet in a vast universe….

When I think about my friend’s advice to start reading the Bible deeply, one book stretched over many months, it reminds me of how vast this story is. I suppose that’s how we have hundreds of years of theology and graduate degrees uncovering all that we don’t know.

Her advice also reminded me to think about the humbling experience of walking through nature. I would never presume that I was conquering a trail or hiking a mountain for the sake of crossing it off my list. In some ways, that’s how reading the Bible in a year felt – like an accomplishment to cross off a list.

What if I approached my faith and study of that faith with the same humbleness I approach nature? What if I knew I was learning for the sake of asking more questions, rather than finding answers? How would that change my relationship with God?

I wonder how this would change my relationship with my community? If I went into conversations for the sake of finding out more and more, rather than knowing a story?

I’ve been reading more about God’s curious nature. In Jan Richardson’s In the Sanctuary of Women, she reframes the story of Eve through the lens of curiosity. For so long, we’ve viewed this character trait as the root of our sinful nature. What if this is an expression of the glory of God? How would we approach life and faith differently if we viewed curiosity as a blessing rather than a curse?

Walking humbly doesn’t come naturally to me. I want to know and to check off the knowledge boxes. But humbleness is grounding myself in the unknown and breathing in the slow walk of discovery.

What’s your view of curiosity – is it a blessing or a curse? How do you approach curiosity in your faith journey?

BackyardThis post is Day 25 of the Write 31 Days Challenge. I’m spending the month of October writing about the Backyard Justice. You can find the entire series over at my Backyard Justice page.